Kenya

The Kenyan Rift Valley (KRV) is an exceptional region to exemplify the spatial heterogeneity, the socio-economic challenges, as well as the opportunities for Kenya and in a bigger perspective for many (east) African countries. Its importance is first of all based on its sheer size and spatial configuration: Spanning from the northwest to the south of Kenya, the Rift Valley accounts for 23% of the Kenyan land mass. The ambitious Kenya Vision 2030 aims to improve the prosperity of all Kenyans whilst building a just and cohesive society by developing flagship projects to induce economic growth and social transformation. Since 2013, the KRV has been strongly shaped by one of the most important flagship projects of this agenda. LAPSSET intersects especially with the central and northern parts of the Rift Valley and is discussed as being a transformative game changer for the region. KRV and LAPSSET are examples of fragmented intensification with historically and economically diverse processes of transformation. With the future vision of exploiting geothermal (and wind) energy as well as fresh water resources for establishing a cut-flower and export-oriented field vegetable industry in the KRV, investments in infrastructure (i.e. road constructions linking Narok in the south to Chemolingot in the north) provide access to national and international markets, and foster investments in other infrastructure measures along the corridor, but also attract investors, developing the value chain for agricultural products. Such developments provide a strong pull for labor in-migration, intensified crop agriculture and the sedentarization of pastoralists.

News

June 1, 2022

Future-making and scalar politics in a resource frontier: Energy projects in northern Kenya

Abstract This contribution explores conflicts in the context of energy-related investments and infrastructure projects in Kenya’s arid and semiarid north. Over the past decade or so […]
April 13, 2022

COVID-19: Food insecurity and coping strategies in Kenya, Namibia, and Tanzania

Abstract This study assesses the extent of COVID-19-related food insecurity in Kenya, Tanzania, and Namibia. Using the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale, we measure food insecurity […]
January 12, 2022

Ecological shocks and non-cognitive skills: Evidence from Kenya

Abstract Non-cognitive skills such as locus of control (LOC) and self-efficacy have been theoretically shown to influence behavioural and economic decision-making. While this effect has been […]

Partner Institutions

Kenyatta University


British Institute in Eastern Africa


National Museums of Kenya


United States International University


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